Rule of Law and Governance

Banner Image: 

Sections

Rule of Law and Governance

Arizona State University offers a wealth of cross-disciplinary expertise in law, criminology, political science and regional studies to take on global challenges of governance and citizen security throughout the developing world. ASU’s approach to these issues is intensely practical, bridging the gap between the worlds of academe and real-life application. Faculty experts in law bring specialized experience and skills to support judicial, legislative and security reform and strengthen institutions in emerging countries. In the social sciences, public policy experts and regional specialists generate evidence-based analysis with an eye for application in communities and law enforcement. ASU also draws upon professional schools in education, nursing and health, public administration, business, and engineering to apply governance principles to sector reform for citizen-centered outcomes. Some of ASU’s specific capabilities in enhancing the rule of law and citizen security include:

  • ASU’s Center for Violence Prevention and Community Solutions develops strategic responses to violent crime in the U.S. and in developing nations by evaluating policies and programs, analyzing patterns and causes of violence, developing new programs and best practice models, and providing training and technical assistance to law enforcement. For more than a decade, the center has partnered with the Organization of American States and United Nations Development Program to understand and diagnose problems associated with citizen security throughout the English-speaking Caribbean.
  • The Rule of Law & Governance Program at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, developed in partnership with the McCain Institute for International Leadership, assists governments, civil society organizations, institutes of higher learning, and businesses to develop and strengthen their countries’ legal systems and governance structures. The program draws on the expertise of over one hundred ASU Law faculty members with a range of specialties, including human rights, international, energy, and environmental law, as well as foreign legal systems such as sharia law. The experience of the law school’s faculty is complemented by the program’s international network of legal and development experts allowing ASU Law to respond to the demands of local communities with innovative and pragmatic rule of law and governance programs.
  • ASU’s Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict promotes interdisciplinary research and education on the dynamics of religion and conflict to advance knowledge, seek solutions and inform policy. The center fosters innovative and engaged thinking on a wide range of issues related to the advancement of peace, religious tolerance, women’s rights and development, and creates links between the academic world and that of professionals, policymakers, practitioners and religious leaders.
  • The Center on the Future of War examines policies for dealing with conflict and post-conflict situations through collaborative research projects and reports, connecting ASU faculty with policymakers and national media, and designing and implementing innovative educational programming.